Thirty-Five Drawings

New York

November 2 – December 21, 2001

Milton Avery
Quiet Bay, 1948
Watercolor on paper
22 1/2 x 30 3/4 in.
57 x 79 cm
Jennifer Bartlett
Study for the Mayo Clinic Project I, 2001
Gouache and pencil on paper
26 x 40 1/2 in.
66 x 103 cm
Joseph Cornell
Untitled (Hotel du Nord), 1960s
Double-sided collage
11 1/2 x 8 1/2 in.
29 x 21.5 cm
Jim Dine
Looking in the Dark #3, 1984
Charcoal on paper
43 1/8 x 30 1/2 in.
109.5 x 77.5 cm
David Hockney
Green Pool with Diving Board & Shadow (Paper Pool #3, version K), 1978
Colored and pressed paper pulp
49 1/2 x 32 in.
126 x 81 cm
David Klamen
Untitled, 2001
Graphite on paper
10 x 14 in.
25 x 35.5 cm
Henri Matisse
La Persane, Nice, 1929
Pencil on paper
19 x 12 1/4 in.
48 x 31 cm
Pablo Picasso
Joueur de flute de pan, 1923
Pen and India ink on paper
12 1/2 x 9 5/8 in.
32 x 24.5 cm
Andy Warhol
Lenin, 1986 - 1987
Graphite on paper
31 3/4 x 23 7/8 in.
81 x 61 cm

THIRTY-FIVE DRAWINGS
New York : November 2 - December 21, 2001


Drawings have historically been used by artists as a means to an end; a way to work out problems in composition or perspective; to organize thoughts conveyed intuitively through the artist's hand onto paper. Only in the last century have they come to be appreciated by collectors and created by the artists as finished works in themselves. Their immediacy and candor allow the viewer a window, however illusory, into the mind of their creator, manifesting for us the thoughts of the artist. From portraiture to still lives, studies to abstractions, this selection of thirty-five drawings offer - sometimes meditative, occasionally explosive, but always compelling - works by some of the most important artists working today and throughout the past century.

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