Richard Gray Gallery

Richard Gray Gallery

EXPO Chicago 2015

September 17, 2015

Richard Gray Gallery at EXPO Chicago 2015: Booth 319. Presenting work by Marc Chagall, Bethany Collins, Jim Dine, Jean Dubuffet, Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Eric Fischl, Sam Francis, Alberto Giacometti, Philip Guston, Eva Hesse, David Hockney, Hans Hofmann, Malia Jensen, Alex Katz, David Klamen, Roy Lichtenstein, Glenn Ligon, John McLaughlin, Pablo Picasso, Jaume Plensa, Leon Polk Smith, Ed Ruscha, Mitchell Squire, Evelyn Statsinger, John Stezaker, Marc Swanson, Andy Warhol and Christopher Wool.

Ewan Gibbs

Ewan Gibbs

Co-curates Roy Lichtenstein exhibition at the FLAG Art Foundation

February 8 - May 17, 2014

The FLAG Art Foundation (New York City) presents Roy Lichtenstein: Nudes and Interiors, curated by Ewan Gibbs and Hilary Harkness, and organized in cooperation with the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation. The exhibition includes 37 works by Lichtenstein, including drawings, collages, and sculpture, as well two original works created by curators Gibbs and Harkness in conjunction with the show. The exhibition is on view from February 8-May 17, 2014, and an illustrated catalogue will be available.

In this exhibition, Gibbs and Harkness invite the viewers to take a glimpse into the world of Lichtenstein’s interiors and his nudes. A world packed with the indelible marks of a career that spanned decades and integrated a variety of artistic influences. Gibbs approaches Lichtenstein’s interiors from a place of comfort and familiarity, having worked directly from photographs of hotel rooms taken from holiday brochures since 1993. It was Lichtenstein, with his use of pictures from comics, phone books and advertisements, who provided Gibbs with a feeling of artistic freedom and confidence to use mass-produced advertising images as source material.

Harkness finds Lichtenstein’s ability to assimilate high and low visual influences into a language that was his own inspiration. For this exhibition, she has chosen to feature Lichtenstein’s late nudes, many of which were painted when the artist was in his seventies- a time when, Harkness observes, he no longer had anything to prove and nothing to lose, which results in works laced with a palpable joie de vivre.

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